3 Tips for Making Sure an Ad Hoc iOS Build Will Work

If you build iOS apps and send the IPA to others to install, there are a few simple checks you can do before you send it that will make sure it will work.

  1. Go into your Build Settings and set the “Validate Built Product” to Yes — that way you won’t be able to build if your provisions are wrong. This is the default for new projects in recent versions of Xcode, but check it to make sure.
  2. Open the IPA that was created. It’s a bundle, so copy and rename the extension to .zip. Then look for the mobileprovision XML file.  You should see the device UDID that you intend to send it to.
  3. Always increase the version # of any build that leaves your machine.  If you don’t do this, iPhone Utility or anything else can decide to offer a cached version instead. If you have a good place in your app to show the version, do it.

If #1 above causes you not to be able to build, then use Apple’s Provisioning Troubleshooting guide.

If the device isn’t listed in the mobileprovision file, then make sure it’s added to the provision in developer.apple.com’s certificate area.  Regenerate it and download it once it’s right.

Even if you are using a system like TestFlight, you should follow these tips. TestFlight can’t make an invalid app work, and it can’t fix an IPA that doesn’t have all of the device UDIDs in it.  All it does is automate over-the-air IPA installs (which is great), but it still operates within the confines of the app distribution system.